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  • NAFA Administrator posted an article
    The EVA Podcast: The Resilience of the Business Aviation Industry with JSSI's Neil Book see more

    NAFA member and JSSI President and CEO Neil Book joins Chris Notter to discuss JSSI and the resilience of the business aviation industry during these challenging times. HEAD OVER TO EVA for more from this series, or listen to the podcast below:

    This podcast was originally published by JSSI on November 17, 2020.

     

  • NAFA Administrator posted an article
    Nine Things to Know When Leasing an Aircraft see more

    NAFA member, George Kleros, Sr. Vice President, Strategic Event Management & Fleet Support at JSSI, shares information on aircraft leasing.

    When leasing an aircraft, what are your maintenance obligations during and at the end of the lease term to ensure that the returned aircraft maintains its value? 

    Focused on that residual value, the lessor will designate a qualified inspector or auditor to perform periodic records reviews and/or asset inspections, throughout the lease period. The intent is to verify the aircraft’s general condition and ensure it remains in compliance with lease requirements.

    After each check, the inspector will send the lessor a report with the graded condition of the aircraft and any specific findings. If anything can or might affect the residual value, you’ll be required to take corrective action to bring the aircraft into compliance.

    At term end, the lessor will conduct an “off-lease” inspection (similar to a pre-purchase inspection) at a factory-owned or authorized service center. All components and systems must be in full working order; or repaired if not. If the major components are near their life limit, you’d be responsible for covering these costs: either a pro-rated percentage based on time consumed, or 100% of the cost to overhaul if it’s close to the event.

    If the aircraft requires repairs for damage or corrosion, you are responsible for the repair cost. Once any repairs required by the lease are completed, any diminution in value due to damage history will be the lessor’s responsibility.

    So what can you do to preserve the value of the aircraft?

    Do …

    • Review the lease document fully to understand the operation, maintenance and return of the aircraft requirements. A good lease-return scenario always starts with a well-defined and documented set of return conditions. Ask questions for clarification prior to signing, to be sure you fully comprehend the broad scope of your obligations.
       
    • Keep the aircraft clean and polished to protect from corrosion and paint deterioration. Unprotected aircraft deteriorate faster than you might expect. The aircraft interior will be inspected for wear, cleanliness, and damage. The exterior will be checked for oil leaks, paint condition, and structural damage.
       
    • Store the records in a secure, dry, fireproof storage cabinet or safe. Damaged or missing records devalue an aircraft and will change residual value. The lessor will come out either annually or bi-annually to see the aircraft and review the records for accuracy and airworthiness.
       
    • Keep up with routine and scheduled maintenance tasks, even if the aircraft is not flying for extended periods of time.
       
    • Address interior and exterior wear items immediately. Waiting can compound the problem and cost more to correct.

    Don’t …

    • Assume the lease document allows for the aircraft to operate under different regulations or use than originally defined.  If the aircraft flies only for you under FAR Part 91 regulations, don’t move your aircraft into a for-hire Part 135 air-taxi arrangement without consulting the lessor; it may not be allowed.
       
    • Leave the aircraft outside. Store it in a hangar when not in use. Sun, humidity, and high temperatures deteriorate interiors and paint exterior, diminishing the residual value.
       
    • Let the aircraft sit inactive for long periods of time. Your aircraft still needs to be flown and systems exercised to keep systems lubricated and reduce risk for damage.
       
    • Ignore missing paint and erosion strips. This leads to corrosion and will be expensive to correct.

    The lessor always requires hull insurance at a specific dollar amount, and generally seeks high liability insurance limits.  If you acquire an hourly cost maintenance program (HCMP), it can help ensure that the aircraft meets return conditions. The lease should state clearly that the maintenance program was current at lease inception and that the HCMP will be transferred to the lessor. An HCMP is very desirable in a lease transaction. It helps preserve the aircraft’s residual value, and helps you avoid penalties and extra costs. 

    This JSSI article was originally published in Business Aviation Advisor November/December 2020.

  • NAFA Administrator posted an article
    Extended Downtime? How to Maintain Your Jet see more

    NAFA member, George Kleros, Sr. Vice President, Strategic Event Management & Fleet Support at JSSI, discusses COVID-19's impact on the economy, flight department extended downtime, and the maintenance needs of business aircraft.

    If you are one of the flight departments anticipating some extended downtime, following are some areas to give attention to regarding the day-to-day maintenance needs of your aircraft...

    As we begin to consider what the new normal entails on the other side of the coronavirus crisis, it’s clear this will not be an instantaneous recovery for Business Aviation. However, it’s unlikely we will see a return to what we experienced in 2009, one of the most difficult years our industry has ever faced.

    In recent weeks JSSI has been performing claims oversite for insurance underwriters in addition to appraisals, lease returns and aircraft default recoveries for financial institutions.

    Based on the cases we have seen so far, it is apparent that many similar issues that occurred in 2009 have resurfaced.

    For example, although they may not intend to immediately sell their aircraft, many owners have no plans to fly for the foreseeable future, and the overarching behavior at this time is to severely reduce expenses wherever possible.

    There are several important factors to consider when making the decision to cut operating costs and pause aircraft utilization. Here are five areas you should consider as part of financially responsible decision-making during a period of extended downtime.

    Aircraft Inactivity Choices

    When an aircraft sits unused, you have two choices:

    1. Exercise the aircraft, or
    2. Preserve the aircraft.

    In the short-term, exercising the aircraft is going to represent better value for money. Proper preservation of the engines, avionics, APU and airframe requires an extensive, labor-intensive process that involves special equipment to perform correctly.

    Furthermore, several preservation steps will need to reoccur periodically throughout the downtime for certain items.

    At some point, there will be a need to fly the aircraft again, or there may be an opportunity to sell the asset which will require a quick turn to return to airworthiness.

    The process to take an aircraft out of preservation is equally extensive and requires additional labor hours because of all the operational checks involved. The complex process makes sense if you plan to store the aircraft for more than six months, but it is not cost-effective for anything less than that.

    In addition, taking steps to exercise the aircraft will help ensure all systems are working correctly and any issues can be addressed as and when they are discovered, not at the last minute.

    Inspections Remain Necessary

    When an aircraft is parked, it is obviously not accumulating hours or landings. This means hourly or landing-driven inspections are no longer accomplished because they are not due.

    Despite this, it is still highly recommended to keep up with all scheduled calendar inspection events. These are in place for several important reasons, including to control corrosion and keep parts lubricated to prevent future damage.

    The inspection of particular areas of the aircraft at specific intervals is pre-determined by OEM engineers and is based on their findings that a potential issue is most likely to surface within that period. Timely corrective action will allow for the issue to be resolved as efficiently as possible.

    It should also be noted that performing inspections too early might mean missing an underlying problem that is not yet serious enough to be detected and treated. 

    Waiting until the next time the inspection is required may then put you past the critical point, ultimately requiring extensive repairs and special engineering that may contribute to a loss in aircraft value.

    On the other hand, choosing to push the inspection out beyond the scheduled time could lead to the same scenario and extensive damage being incurred from not addressing the problem sooner. This is especially true for aircraft that spend most days outside on the ramp.

    It is therefore highly important to follow the Chapter 5 calendar schedule and always remain within the designed inspection schedule for your specific aircraft.

    Click here to read the full article.

    This article was originally published by AvBuyer on May 11, 2020.

  • NAFA Administrator posted an article
    Return to Lender see more

    NAFA member, George Kleros, Senior VP, Strategic Fleet Management and Fleet Support for Jet Support Services, shares nine things you need to know when leasing an aircraft.

    When leasing an aircraft, what are your maintenance obligations during and at the end of the lease term to ensure that the returned aircraft maintains its value? 

    Focused on that residual value, the lessor will designate a qualified inspector or auditor to perform periodic records reviews and/or asset inspections, throughout the lease period. The intent is to verify the aircraft’s general condition and ensure it remains in compliance with lease requirements.

    After each check, the inspector will send the lessor a report with the graded condition of the aircraft and any specific findings. If anything can or might affect the residual value, you’ll be required to take corrective action to bring the aircraft into compliance.

    At term end, the lessor will conduct an “off-lease” inspection (similar to a pre-purchase inspection) at a factory-owned or authorized service center. All components and systems must be in full working order; or repaired if not. If the major components are near their life limit, you’d be responsible for covering these costs: either a pro-rated percentage based on time consumed, or 100% of the cost to overhaul if it’s close to the event.

    If the aircraft requires repairs for damage or corrosion, you are responsible for the repair cost. Once any repairs required by the lease are completed, any diminution in value due to damage history will be the lessor’s responsibility.

    So what can you do to preserve the value of the aircraft?

    Do …

    • Review the lease document fully to understand the operation, maintenance and return of the aircraft requirements. A good lease-return scenario always starts with a well-defined and documented set of return conditions. Ask questions for clarification prior to signing, to be sure you fully comprehend the broad scope of your obligations.
    • Keep the aircraft clean and polished to protect from corrosion and paint deterioration. Unprotected aircraft deteriorate faster than you might expect. The aircraft interior will be inspected for wear, cleanliness, and damage. The exterior will be checked for oil leaks, paint condition, and structural damage.
    • Store the records in a secure, dry, fireproof storage cabinet or safe. Damaged or missing records devalue an aircraft and will change residual value. The lessor will come out either annually or bi-annually to see the aircraft and review the records for accuracy and airworthiness.
    • Keep up with routine and scheduled maintenance tasks, even if the aircraft is not flying for extended periods of time.
    • Address interior and exterior wear items immediately. Waiting can compound the problem and cost more to correct.

    Don’t …

    • Assume the lease document allows for the aircraft to operate under different regulations or use than originally defined.  If the aircraft flies only for you under FAR Part 91 regulations, don’t move your aircraft into a for-hire Part 135 air-taxi arrangement without consulting the lessor; it may not be allowed.
    • Leave the aircraft outside. Store it in a hangar when not in use. Sun, humidity, and high temperatures deteriorate interiors and paint exterior, diminishing the residual value.
    • Let the aircraft sit inactive for long periods of time. Your aircraft still needs to be flown and systems exercised to keep systems lubricated and reduce risk for damage.
    • Ignore missing paint and erosion strips. This leads to corrosion and will be expensive to correct.

    The lessor always requires hull insurance at a specific dollar amount, and generally seeks high liability insurance limits.  If you acquire an hourly cost maintenance program (HCMP), it can help ensure that the aircraft meets return conditions. The lease should state clearly that the maintenance program was current at lease inception and that the HCMP will be transferred to the lessor. An HCMP is very desirable in a lease transaction. It helps preserve the aircraft’s residual value, and helps you avoid penalties and extra costs. 

    This article originally appeared in Business Aviation Advisor on November 3, 2020.


     

  • NAFA Administrator posted an article
    Business Aviation Flight Hours at an All-Time Low see more

    NAFA member, JSSI, shares their April 2020 JSSI Business Aviation Index showing business aviation flight hours at an all-time low.

    Latest month-on-month activity drops 69.3% due to COVID-19

    CHICAGO,  May 19, 2020 – Business aviation utilization has reached a record low, according to Jet Support Services, Inc. (JSSI), as highlighted by a single-digit monthly flight hour average of 5.9 per aircraft across JSSI’s entire portfolio in April, marking a first for the company. Following its quarterly Business Aviation Index publication, JSSI has released April 2020 data revealing changes in global flight activity and utilization of business aircraft, including jets, turboprops and helicopters between March and April 2020.

    The key findings are:

    • Overall flight hours have reached all-time lows, with activity dropping 69.3% between March and April 2020.
    • Flight hours dropped 77.5% year-over-year.
    • Average flight hours per aircraft across the entire JSSI portfolio averaged 5.9 hours per asset in April 2020.
    • By age, the hardest hit segments were newer aircraft aged under five years, followed by aircraft aged 6-10 years. Both segments saw the two largest month-on-month decreases between March and April 2020.
    • Large cabin aircraft activity slowed the most. Since March 2020, activity has dropped by 84.7%.
    • Helicopters have felt the least impact on flight hours from COVID-19, with flight activity reduced by 27.5% since March 2020.
    • All regions have been hit hard in April 2020, with month-on-month decreases ranging from 48.5% (Asia Pacific) to 74.2% (Europe). Flight activity in every region worldwide is down an average of 27.2% compared to the same four-month period in 2019.  

    Discussing the April figures, Neil Book, president and CEO of JSSI, said:

    “March flight hours saw the largest decline since the global financial crisis of 2008. April’s flight hours are the lowest we have on record, down more than 75% compared to April 2019 and demonstrating the true impact of global lockdown restrictions and border closures since their implementation.”

    “Asia Pacific was the first region struck by COVID-19 and shut down the earliest. As the region has begun to reopen, flight hours in April have had a modest rebound. As a number of countries begin to ease restrictions and borders begin to reopen, we expect to see a slow but steady increase in flight hours worldwide for the month of May. However, we simply do not know how long it will take to get back to 2018 and 2019 levels. The time to market with an effective treatment or vaccine will clearly be the driver of this timeline.”

    “In April, the healthcare industry had the strongest flight hours. This could allude to the utilization of these aircraft for air ambulance and medical supply transportation, a trend continued from our Q1 2020 analysis.”

    “The largest demographic of business jet owners are males over the age of 60, who fall into a “high-risk” category for COVID-19. I’ve had extensive conversations with clients who’ve said they are going to significantly reduce their flying, because they simply will not be attending conferences or staying at hotels at least for now.

    “With that said, we are already seeing a significant number of new users migrating to a wide range of business aviation options, such as jet card, charter, fractional and even outright ownership. For many businesses and individuals with the resources, the health risks associated with walking through a commercial airport with thousands of people and getting onto a commercial flight is simply too great.”  

    Download the April 2020 JSSI Business Aviation Index.

    This article/release was originally published by JSSI on May 19, 2020.

  • NAFA Administrator posted an article
    A Capital Option see more

    NAFA members, Keith Hayes, PNC Aviation Finance, and Lou Seno, JSSI, discuss operating leases in the latest Business Aviation Advisor podcast.

    It’s time to think about rebuilding your business.

    And doing so as soon as it’s safe will require traveling via business aircraft, to reconnect personally, face-to-face, with your key customers, allies, and associates.

    It also may require redeploying your capital to fund those rebuilding efforts. Using an operating lease to finance your aircraft can help you do just that.

    Listen as Keith Hayes, PNC Aviation Finance Senior Vice President, and Lou Seno, JSSI Chairman Emeritus, detail how financing a new aircraft – or refinancing your current one – via an operating lease enables you to devote more capital to your core business.

    When there’s more to be said than space and copy deadlines allow, you can rely on the Business Aviation Advisor Above and Beyond podcasts to get you the information you need, to help you make the most of your aviation investments.

    Thanks for reading, listening – and flying safely!

    Listen to Podcast here

    This podcast was originally published by Business Aviation Advisor on May 18, 2020.

  • Tracey Cheek posted an article
    JSSI’s Commitment to Business Aviation see more

    Dear NAFA Member:

    As an organization, we at JSSI remain committed to providing world-class service and support to our customers and valued members of the business aviation lending and leasing community.

    Providing Financial Relief for Customers
    Effective immediately, JSSI has:

    • Suspended all annual make and model rate increases through June 30, 2020.
    • Implemented a 25% reduction on annual minimum flight hour invoices paid net 30 days, OR;
    • Extended payment terms to 90 days on annual minimum flight hour invoices in lieu of the 25% reduction. For those paying minimums each month the invoice will be reduced by 25%.
    • For operators using aircraft for rescue flights related to COVID-19, those hours along with additional credits will be applied to the account.

    Supporting the Lending and Leasing Community
    JSSI also reaffirms its commitment to the lending and leasing community by providing a range of services to help navigate through these challenging times. We can provide support, even if an aircraft is not currently on a JSSI or OEM program. 

    Advisory Services
    In addition to hourly cost maintenance programs, we are able to assist with pre-funding audits, asset inspections, desktop appraisals and more. Importantly, with over 75 Technical Advisors in strategic locations, we are ready to reach your asset quickly and efficiently without resorting to air travel during these very restrictive times. 

    If you require assistance, please do not hesitate to call JSSI Advisory Services at +1 312.644.4444 or email advisoryservices@jetsupport.com.

    Preservation Guidance
    With so many operators ceasing flight operations at this time, it’s also important to know that the preservation of the airframe, avionics, APU and engines is not only mandated by the manufacturer but also critical to the long-term airworthiness of the entire aircraft. 

    Our Professional Services team would be happy to provide further guidance on preservation requirements for aircraft not already covered by a JSSI program. For further information, please email info@jetsupport.com.

    As always, we value all feedback from the lending and leasing community. If you have any questions or suggestions, please do not hesitate to contact me directly.

    Sincerely,

    Lou

    Louis C. Seno
    Chairman Emeritus
    e: lseno@jetsupport.com

  • Tracey Cheek posted an article
    Why Use An Accredited Aircraft Appraiser? see more

    NAFA member, Louis Seno, ASA, Chairman Emeritus and Special Advisor to the Jet Support Services, Inc. Board of Directors, discusses why using an accredited aircraft appraiser is best.

    Keeping a finger on the pulse of your aircraft’s current valuation is crucial, both for tax and depreciation purposes, and when you seek to refinance or sell your aircraft. (Listen to “Regular Check-Ups,” Above & Beyond Podcast, June 2019.)

    The demand for reputable appraisers is increasing throughout the business aviation industry. Original equipment manufacturers (OEMs), banks and leasing companies, insurance underwriters, and on-demand charter operators all need knowledgeable appraisers they can trust. But what makes an individual qualified to become an appraiser?

    Due to the complex nature of the appraisal profession, education and experience are crucial. However, there are no legal requirements, nor license needed, so anyone can call him- or herself an aircraft appraiser, regardless of their knowledge, skills, experience, or abilities. In response, the American Society of Appraisers (ASA) established an aircraft-specific discipline and designation program, to help assure owners and financial institutions that the aircraft are accurately valued.

    An increased demand for aircraft valuation experts in the early 2000s mandated something more be done. And so a 2016 partnership was formed between ASA and the David B. O’Maley College of Business at Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University to establish a universally accepted industry standard. Together, they developed a series of four courses designed specifically for professional aircraft appraisers, enabling those so committed to achieve a new official accreditation.

    Successful completion of the courses provides participants with the necessary fundamental appraisal coursework to apply for professional accreditation through ASA, with a specialty in aircraft appraisal. The curriculum covers commercial, business, and general aviation aircraft, including fixed-wing and rotorcraft, and other aerospace assets, such as tugs and ground power units.

    ASA’s coursework and testing builds a solid foundation of aviation knowledge. A thorough peer evaluation of appraisal reports is then conducted before an individual can receive the Accredited Member (AM) credentials for two years of experience, or the Accredited Senior Appraiser (ASA) credentials for five years of experience. 

    Additionally, there is a 100-hour continuing education requirement to be completed during the five years after receiving ASA accreditation. Courses and advanced conferences are offered around the globe for ASA appraisers to learn more about current issues and prepare for future valuation challenges.

    “The accreditation process is detailed and meticulous,” said Johnnie White, ASA’s CEO. “We recognize that your turbine aircraft is a multimillion-dollar asset. To ensure its proper valuation, we set high standards on educating our designated members.”

    You can secure a qualified appraisal for your aircraft in one of two ways:

    • In a desktop valuation, the appraiser will go well beyond a simple pricing comparison by researching the current aircraft on the market, establishing the average days the aircraft model has been on the market, and evaluating any trending data. The appraiser also will assess the maintenance status, look for any major inspection expenses that could be coming due, and perform a cursory check of the logbooks and specifications for the aircraft without looking at the asset. This is the less costly option.
    • A physical, onsite appraisal will consist of all of the above, plus a hands-on inspection that includes a thorough examination of the aircraft, including engine and airframe maintenance logbooks. With this option, you will pay for the appraiser to travel to and from your aircraft, for the time spent on the physical inspection of the aircraft and records, and for research of recent sales of comparable make/model aircraft to establish the asset’s current market value.

    When your aircraft needs an appraisal or reappraisal for insurance or refinancing purposes, or to prepare for its disposition, choose an ASA-accredited appraiser who has invested in their profession to become the most accomplished and skilled person to appraise your aircraft and to keep a pulse on its value for years to come. 

    This article was originally published by Business Aviation Advisor on November 1, 2019.

  • Tracey Cheek posted an article
    How to Build a Business Aircraft Acquisition Plan see more

    NAFA member, David Wyndham, Vice President with Conklin & de Decker, discusses the importance of developing a thorough aircraft acquisition plan.

    With a sense of urgency and a large sum of cash, an aircraft acquisition can be completed rather quickly. However, without a plan or the right team in place, these types of scrambles typically result in the wrong aircraft for the job, or just simply picking the wrong aircraft. To avoid the headache from an impulse purchase, you need to build a business aircraft acquisition plan.

    To begin, there are two fundamental reasons for acquiring new or different aircraft:

    1. The current aircraft can no longer perform the mission, or
    2. The current aircraft is no longer the most cost-effective solution.

    Changes in mission need to be quantified. As an example, one client in the Eastern US started flying shorter trips with fewer people. Their eight-passenger jet, with a 1,800nm range, was more than they needed.

    Instead, they found that a five-passenger airplane that’s more efficient on short trips might be the next aircraft for them.

    But how can you quantify what it is that you need and want? Economics are critical. The cost of an aircraft is more than the acquisition price alone. It encompasses the total costs needed to operate the aircraft and allow for a future residual value.

    As an example, a single aircraft that meets 98% of usage requirements may cost far more than an aircraft that meets 85% of your needs with a supplemental jet card, charter or fractional solution in place for the remaining 15%.

    What Should Your Acquisition Plan Include?

    It is important for you to understand what it costs to own and operate the aircraft – and this will all come into your acquisition plan. So, what should your acquisition plan include?

    An aircraft acquisition plan must (at a minimum):

    • Identify, quantify and differentiate your needs and wants;
    • Identify and rank the possible aircraft types by mission capability; and
    • Analyze all the costs involved with the aircraft.

    Your plan should be void of emotional issues and stay as far from subjective criteria as possible. To help in this respect, you will need someone who can ask the tough questions and assist with an unbiased analysis of the candidate aircraft.

    Consultants may offer the unbiased review that you initially need, and their feedback will need to cover both technical and financial aspects of the aircraft acquisition.

    Who Should be on Your Acquisition Team?

    As you proceed with the acquisition you need to add expertise across several fields to your team. Tax planning should begin well before the purchase, not after the closing, meaning that you will need to hire someone familiar with taxes as they apply to aviation.

    You will also need to consult a qualified aviation attorney to ensure that the contracts are appropriate and that the various regulatory issues are addressed. A document that looks good from a basic business perspective may not be legal in the eyes of the FAA or other aviation authority.

    Don't overlook the insurance broker, who will need to be kept informed as to when and how the aircraft is to be used. (For example, if the aircraft is to be placed on a management agreement, who and how are each of the parties to that agreement going to be covered?)

    You will also need an aircraft sales professional, who will ideally have an excellent understanding of the aircraft sales market — what the availability is; lead times for various models; who to contact about pre-buy inspections and appraisals; and how long it could take to dispose of your current aircraft.

    Moreover, the aircraft sales professional you hire will need all the qualities required to be an excellent facilitator, since their job will also be to make sure the deal closes and that all parties are happy.

    Additional Planning When Buying New…

    Moreover, if you are buying a new aircraft, specifying all the options, picking out paint, and choosing an interior may take a minimum of six months and may well require the services of additional advisors.

    In Summary…

    Think of your business aircraft acquisition as a “time-is-money” deal. That is, if you don’t have much time, you’ll probably spend even more money! If you are looking to close a deal by the end of this year, you need to be looking seriously right now, and investing in all of the right areas to ensure your acquisition plan results in the right aircraft, at the right cost, at the right time.

    This article was originally published by AvBuyer on October 25, 2019.

  • Tracey Cheek posted an article
    JSSI Advisory Services Joins National Aircraft Finance Association see more

    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

    EDGEWATER, Md.Feb. 14, 2019 - National Aircraft Finance Association (NAFA) is pleased to announce that JSSI Advisory Services has joined its professional network of aviation lenders as a stand-alone member. This Jet Support Services, Inc. (JSSI®) company supports a global customer base with ad hoc services and is a leading provider of aircraft services to lenders, insurance companies and operators worldwide. 

    “NAFA members proudly finance, support, or enable the financing of general and business aviation aircraft throughout the world, and we’re happy to add JSSI Advisory Services to our association,” said Ford von Weise, President of NAFA.

    JSSI Advisory Services leverages 30 years of JSSI expertise and data to deliver technical advice and consulting services to clients. As an independent provider of maintenance support to virtually all makes and models of business aircraft, JSSI oversees 8,000 maintenance events per year with a global network of over 70 technical advisors. This depth and breadth of resources, along with its 2018 acquisition of Conklin & de Decker, have allowed JSSI Advisory Services to gain market share and position itself as a “one-stop shop” for aircraft owners, operators and financiers seeking guidance on often complex aviation matters. 

    “We’re proud to officially join NAFA and look forward to serving members with an unparalleled suite of services,” said Jason Schwab, President of JSSI Advisory Services and Conklin & de Decker. “We can help members in any location at every stage of the aircraft life cycle, from acquisition to operation to retirement,” Schwab added. 

    JSSI Advisory Services delivers many high-level professional services, including maintenance event management, ASA- and USPAP-certified appraisals, and on-site technical inspections of aircraft, records, and flight operations. Additional services include maintenance cost forecasting, completion inspections, fleet monitoring, delivery acceptance and ad hoc consulting engagements.

    For three decades, JSSI has been the leading independent provider of maintenance programs to the aviation industry, covering airframes, engines and APUs. JSSI provides comprehensive, flexible and affordable financial programs and tools for managing the often unpredictable costs of operating and maintaining business and commercial jets, turboprops and helicopters.  

    Much like NAFA, JSSI Advisory Services is shaped by a culture of collaboration, innovation and integrity, striving for excellence in the aviation industry. JSSI and NAFA continue to foster the highest standards in service and safety through their support of business and community. For more information about JSSI Advisory Services, visit www.jetsupport.com/advisory-services.  

    About NAFA: 

    The National Aircraft Finance Association (NAFA) is a non-profit corporation dedicated to promoting the general welfare of individuals and organizations providing aircraft financing and loans secured by aircraft; to improving the industry's service to the public; and to providing our members with a forum for education and the sharing of information and knowledge to encourage the financing, leasing and insuring of general aviation aircraft. For more information about NAFA, visit www.NAFA.aero.