AOPA FInance

  • NAFA Administrator posted an article
    What Happens Once I'm Approved? see more

    NAFA member, Adam Meredith, President of AOPA Aviation Finance Company, shares two important final steps when securing an aircraft loan.

    What happens once I’m approved for an aircraft loan? There are still two steps remaining to secure a loan. Approval means the bank has approved both you and the airplane. Now the question is, are you ready? The second step, post-approval, is getting the bank everything needed to fund.

    Once a lender is comfortable with the aircraft, the borrower, the ownership structure of the borrowing entity, and the global financial picture of the entities in which the owner or owners have a controlling interest, they’ll signal they are OK to scheduling closing. How do they get there though?

    You now do your part by providing the remaining paperwork—any missing financial documents necessary, copies of the ownership documents (the EIN document, the articles of organization, and the operating agreement), if applicable. Note if you intend to have a holding company own the aircraft, the time to form the company correctly and completely is earlier on because the lender will need to verify the legal structure and documents before it can approve the loan and issue loan documents.

    It’s been our experience that people frequently take the organizational structure of an aircraft holding company too lightly when they shouldn’t. Lenders take it very seriously. There’s a legal difference between how a member-managed LLC signature block is executed versus a manager-managed LLC. So get, and heed, good advice and do so before getting approval (otherwise let the lender know it’s in the works and discuss the specifics).

    Next, a title and escrow company will review the aircraft’s ownership and title history and share that with the lender. The lender will review the aircraft’s logbooks for completeness, the purchase and sale agreement, as well as the pre-purchase inspection or signed off documentation from an A&P to confirm that the airplane is in airworthy condition. The title and escrow company handling your transaction may even assist with the last document required prior to closing, the certificate of insurance (COI).

    The escrow and title company will also handle the coordination of payments to the lender, you, and any third-party vendors attached to the aircraft at the time the lender releases the funds. Finally, the lender will authorize the release of funds once any requested supplemental documents have been received and vetted.

    This article was originally published by AOPA Finance on October 23, 2020.

  • NAFA Administrator posted an article
    Adam Meredith, of AOPA Finance, addresses commonly asked questions on aircraft ownership. see more

    NAFA member, Adam Meredith, President of AOPA Finance, addresses commonly asked questions on aircraft ownership during this difficult time.  Purchasing an aircraft can be a challenging process under normal circumstances, but can be even more difficult to navigate during market volatility.

    Question: With the current market volatility, do you find that lenders are tightening or loosening their credit requirements?

    Answer: We have definitely seen some that are tightening credit. Specifically, some lenders are requesting copies of bank/investment statements that are within the last couple of days (vs. 30 days, under regular times). Given stock market volatility this isn’t too surprising. Also, we’ve seen some lenders that are being more cautious lending to individuals with direct financial exposure to COVID-19 (i.e. service industry companies not deemed essential).

    Question: What advice are you giving to members who were currently looking to purchase before all of the shelter in place orders? Should we continue our search or place our search on hold until all of this blows over?

    If you’re personally at high risk (financially or otherwise) to COVID-19, you’d be well advised to pause the purchase process. However, for everyone else, I’d encourage you to keep looking and work with sellers to create a plan for how to push through the closing process. For advice on guidance with shelter in place requirements, reach out to our trusted legal staff if you’re a legal services plan participant. If not, reach out to our Pilot Information Center to get the latest guidance.

    This article was originally published by AOPA Finance on April 23, 2020.

  • Tracey Cheek posted an article
    Adam Meredith, President of AOPA Finance, shares prebuy tips when financing a turboprop. see more

    NAFA member, Adam Meredith, President of AOPA Aviation Finance Company, shares prebuy tips when financing a turboprop.

    We highly recommend getting a pre-buy inspection. It could save you thousands of dollars over time. Here we’ve summarized some important points to consider as you move through the purchasing process.

    1. ALWAYS have a prebuy done. No bank should let you finance a plane without it.
    2. The shop doing the prebuy should specialize in the type of airplane you are buying. We also recommend selecting a shop that has no ties to the airplane.
    3. Give yourself plenty of time to get the prebuy done. Typically, they take 1-2 days, however you might want to add a buffer so you don’t end up getting rushed as a closing date approaches.
    4. Typically, the buyer pays to reposition the airplane and the seller will pay for correcting any maintenance issues relating to airworthiness.
    5. Use the Purchase & Sales agreement to define the sales price plus conditions such as the amount of time to complete the prebuy, who pays for what, and who pays to move the airplane.
    6. Don’t forget to ask for a fresh annual during the prebuy. This is oftentimes required by banks unless one has been completed recently.
    7. If you end up with a reduced purchase amount after the prebuy, that doesn’t mean you can reduce your down payment by that amount. Most lenders require the lesser of loan to value OR loan to purchase amount.

    Competitive rates and terms. Custom financing options. Helpful and responsive reps. Three good reasons to turn to AOPA Finance when you are buying a turboprop or turbine airplane. If you need a dependable source of financing with people who are on your side, just call 800.62.PLANE (75263) or click here to request a quote.

    This article was originally published by AOPA Aviation Finance Company on February 4, 2019.